I’ve Always Had a Thing for Books


I remember the joy and excitement I would feel if my mother was able to give me a few dollars to order a new book from the little Scholastic Book Club order forms. This wasn’t often. We didn’t have a lot of extra money but when I could, it meant everything. 


When the books arrived, it felt like Christmas. I cherished my books and still do today. 


When I didn’t have money to order books, I would hit the West Dallas Public Library. I would catch the Metro and then DART bus, often alone or with my brother. The library was a haven for me. I felt so relaxed surrounded by books. This is before computers invaded the libraries. 


I would leave the library late in the evening and use my transfer to go back home. I would lock myself in my room and read Judy Blume or The Babysitters Club. One of my favorite series was the Little House on the Prairie books. 


Once I got to middle school and high school the books became more advanced and the themes more mature. When I got to college, I was exposed to all of the Black classics. I was introduced to J California Cooper and Toni Morrison. 


Most of my time in libraries was replaced with spending time in bookstores. I remember going to The Black Bookworm in Wynnwood or African Imports in Redbird Mall looking for books with themes that reflected my culture. 


Now my shelves are quickly filling up with business-related books or those on mental fortitude. 


My bucket list is made up of libraries around the world that I want to visit. I had the pleasure of visiting two of those with my family members.


I said all of that to say, what are you reading? 


I recently completed reading a few books. A couple includes Free to Focus by Michael

Hyatt and Atomic Habits by James Clear.


But what I'm really excited about is The Memo! The Memo by Minda Harts is a must-read for African American women and for the public in general. The Memo address the difficult topic of what women of color face in the workplace. It also calls on women of color and White allies to address the inequities head-on.


I had the pleasure of meeting Minda last night at a book signing and live recording of the BOLD Black Girls podcast. The discussion was real. It needs to be had. The Memo is a great place to start.


Reading is critical to continuing education. I love to include book studies as a component of my coaching. It evaluates the learning process to include other voices.


If you have been considering getting help to move your business forward, I would love to chat with you about your business goals. Just click here to schedule your call. If you would like to discuss your take on The Memo, or any other books suggested, email me at carla@bossingly.com. I would love to hear from you.